Hippies

  • Boston Tea Party Posters

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

     

    Sixties Posters has assembled the largest collection of Boston Tea Party posters I've seen anywhere and the best part is that you can bid on them. You'll need deep pockets though.

    The Boston Tea Party was a concert venue located on 53 Berkeley Street in Boston, Massachusetts.

    Originally the site of a synagogue, and then a street mission, the location was later converted into a venue that showed underground films, before being bought by Ray Riepen and David Hahn and converted again into a concert venue. It opened as a rock music hall on January 20, 1967.

    The venue became associated with the psychedelic movement, being similar in this way to other contemporary rock halls such as New York's Fillmore East and Electric Circus, San Francisco's Fillmore West, and Philadelphia's Electric Factory.

    The early history of this venue is documented in the book Mansion on the Hill by Fred Goodman.

    Wikipedia

    You might also like: Stereolab Album Covers & The Mystery of Hotcha! | Alan Aldridge | Barney Bubbles | Milton Glaser | Vintage Book Covers | Sister Corita | Anonima Group

  • Cool Ass Blog | Black Lung

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

       

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

       

      

     

    Dip into the glorious Black Lung

  • Cool Ass Blog | The Acid Sweat Lodge

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

     

    More @ The Acid Sweat Lodge
  • Cosmic Gypsy Pagan Hippie Sex Magick

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

    Peculiar, Sexy, enter the world of COSMIC DUST

  • Destination Out Takes You There

    Destination Out is a good station to prepare for orbit.  They deal primarily with Free Jazz but also No Wave, Experimental, Films, books, even shoegaze. The experience is a whole lot better if you're wearing a dashiki. Prepare for take off.

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

     

     

      

      

  • Feed Your Head The Good Stuff

    Feed Your Head complied a collection of scanned underground papers dealing with psychedelics and the mainstream papers that covered them.  The images below are some of the examples featured on the site. These, along with Feed Your Head's "nutshell" explanations of the papers, feature the usual suspects - Ginsberg, Leary, McKenna, Heard, Watts, Kesey and handful of the lesser known characters.

     

      

      

      

      

     

      

      

      

      

  • Good Movie | Chappaqua

      

      

    Chappaqua is a 1966 cult film written, directed by and starring Conrad Rooks. It is based on Rooks' experiences with drug addiction. It includes cameo appearances by a host of famous names of the 1960s: author William S. Burroughs, guru Swami Satchidananda, beat poets Allen Ginsberg and Moondog, and Ravi Shankar, who co-wrote the score with Philip Glass. Rooks had commissioned jazz artist Ornette Coleman to compose music for the film, but his score, which has become known as the Chappaqua Suite was ultimately not used. Coleman too makes a cameo appearance in the film.

    The film briefly depicts its namesake, Chappaqua, New York, a sleepy hamlet in Westchester County, in a few minutes of wintry panoramas. The hamlet is an overt symbol of drug-free, suburban childhood innocence, and is also one of the film's many nods to Native American culture. The northern Westchester area had been heavily inhabited by Native Americans; the word chappaqua itself derives from the Wappinger (a nation of the Algonquin tribe) word for 'laurel swamp'.

      

     

     CAST & CREW

     

    Conrad Rooks, Ravi Shankar, Ornette Coleman, The Fugs, Allan Ginsberg, Phillip Glass, William S. Burroughs, Moondog, Jean-Louis Barrault, Guru Swami & More...

     

      

      

      

     

    THE AMAZING TRAILER
     

  • Interview With Artist Courtney Brooke Hall

     

    If you're a regular to this site, you'll most likely recognize the image above. This photo appeared on our homepage for quite some timed as the seductive picture designed to lure visitors to our blog. The photograph is a self-portrait by photographer, Courtney Brooke Hall, an artist working from the area of Western Massachusetts so rich with interesting artists, that The Pixies (who began there) once referred to it as the "Valley full of pioneers." Courtney agreed to talk to us about her work, but before she does, I thought it would be nice to provide a little background music.  The Youtube clip below is a song from Greg Weeks, a member of the Philadelphia based band The Espers, the founder of the Drag City imprint label, Language of Stone, and a personal friend of Courtney. Enjoy.

     

     

    RINY: When I first saw your photographs, I thought I was looking at an interesting collection of found photographs from the seventies.  Do you intentionally try to create a retro look?

    CBH: Being able to look back in time objectively allows us to hunt down the positive aspects of time periods. The 70’s do appeal to me, but mostly as a reference point to now.  I seem to be drawn to times when youth in culture took a stand against societies norms, such as the 20's or the 60's. I am very into the 70’s aesthetic, but now is a really interesting time to live, and to be able to take the positive things from the past and refine them into something even more amazing.

         

    RINY: What draws you to that era?

    CBH: They were times that pushed buttons, the Woman’s Suffrage movement and getting the vote in 1920, the liberation that brought, and then in the 60's, well everyone knows about that. The hippies, the rock and roll, THE DRUGS, it seemed so great. The 70's seemed to be so hip so down to earth, and yet so crazy, it was a time of sexual freedom, and I love that sort of thing. There was a back to the land mentality too, trying to become in tune with nature. It was all so beautiful, the ideas, the music, the clothes, and certainly I'm romanticizing these eras. What I try to take from them personally is the part of these times that seemed to have a great deal of realism to them, had people trying to unfetter themselves and get back the core of what it meant to be a human.  All this unrest and open thought triggered so much great art, fashion, and philosophy.

         

    RINY: Your aesthetic, to me anyways, seems very west coast, like these pictures seem like scenes from Northern California or maybe even New Mexico, yet you work in Western Mass. I lived up there for a while and know there’s definitely a lot of sub cultural icons up there - J Mascis, Thurston Moore, Kim Gordon, Lou Barlow, a bunch of Free Jazz guys like Archie Shepp and Yusef Lateef, and then the crop of guys like Sunburned Hand of the Man, who ‘s music seems complimentary to your work. Are you involved with any of this? If so, how?  If not, what is going on up there in your world?

    CBH: I have yet to make it to Northern California and I get told this pretty often. I need to make a point to go and actually see it for myself. Part of the reason I haven't been is because I am so connected with this place I live, all of New England really. I just love it here, the seasons, the magic and the history it has. All the forests here seem haunted. I have driven across the country a few times now and visited some great places, New Mexico included. I loved it there in fact, and yet still I can't picture any other place as home.

    I have yet to really run into most of the people you mentioned. I think that it's due to the fact that right now, musically speaking that’s just not the sound I'm into. I actually did meet J Mascis to do art for Witch's second Album.

            

         

    RINY: You shoot a lot of self-portraits. What are you trying explore with these photographs as opposed to say, shooting other subjects or landscapes?

    CBH: I think at one point I wanted to be an actress, when I was younger I was in plays but nothing very serious. Being the subject of my photos lets me get out my need for that, I feel all these little characters just twirling inside me, and in my photographs I get to let those little creatures come to life. I think a lot of people have these sides of them, people you can't just be everyday, but through art they can explode and you can be as fanciful and crazy as you want. It’s an important outlet to be able to live inside a part of a personal fairytale. Honestly a big part of my self-portraits has to do with living out in the woods and not having people to shoot without advanced planning. Most of my self-portraits are done when I look outside and I get inspired by the light hitting the trees, and it's just impossible to organize a spur of the moment shoot with someone who lives far away.

    RINY: You also shoot a lot of women. Who are these women and why shoot women as opposed to men?

    CBH: I think for the similar reasons I like self portraits, it's as if women find it easier to be softer, sexy, dreamier, and they seem so ready to play one of those roles they have tucked away, they are ready to pull out one of their little characters and show it off.  I also have a strong tendency to shoot in nature and there is something about a woman in nature that seems innate. Over the years I have been blessed with many wonderful lady friends, truly talented people. Most of the women I photograph, that’s who they are, my friends.

       

      


    RINY: Your work seems to have an overwhelming theme of sexuality, women, hippies and Psychedelia. It also seems to have undertones of outlaw biker culture, Wiccan and occult themes. What about these themes are you drawn to?

    CBH: I am a big fan of nature and the natural world, of people realizing their true self, and their oneness with the universe, a sense of a greater cosmic community. Many of those themes you listed tend to show up in my work because they are all, to one degree or another, anti-establishment themes. It's rarely a determined decision to try and make one of my photo sets have a certain theme besides highlighting a part of a person's personality, or working with costumes and surroundings that inspire me. It's not as if I set out to replicate specific sub cultural themes, but if those themes have inspired me then they will certainly be present in my work.

      

      

      

     RINY: How do you approach a concept and how do you choose and direct your subjects?

    CBH: It's strange I feel like day to day I am collecting little mental notes and storing them away for the right moment, and often I don't put them all together until the last minute. Part of that has to do with my subject. Concepts for them are like a hand picked, tailored outfit. Rarely do I have a concept and try to get someone to fill it. More often I find myself looking for a pretty face, or wistful body and then I create a world around them.  When I am working within that concept I will often go over a short story with my model/friend, or describe a character to them and 99% of the time they get it right it away, as if that person was inside them all the time. It's inspiring to watch that happen and my work benefits from that process.

      

    RINY: What inspires you culturally?

    CBH: EVERYTHING! Art, film, history, nature, science, folklore, friends. It's virtually impossible to cite specific things that inspire me; it's hard to explain how a fragrance can inspire a photograph. Although I work in a visual medium, it's not solely images that inspire me.

    RINY: Does music inspires your work?

    CBH: Oh, of course! I love to have a soundtrack to the stories I create and photograph. I'll put on a Bo Hansson record and drift away to other worlds and get glimpses of what I can bring back to this one.  It's so exciting to find new music and get lost in it, and especially exciting when I can get lost in the music my friends make. It seems as though I'm constantly surrounded by musicians too, which is always wonderful. Honestly I have limited musical skills, but I'm in a band with my man, Chris, and Greg Weeks and his wife Jessica. We don't get to play together often because of distance, but the one show we played was in between a double feature of Jodorowsky's El Topo and The Holy Mountain. It was a phenomenal experience and it really needs to happen more often. Playing music with other people is so exciting to me because it's a visceral experience that is unique and new to me.

     

      

    RINY: You’ve done some work for bands like the Black Rebel Motorcycle Club, Cinerama, Greg Weeks of The Espers, Witch, Feathers, Bat For Lashes, etc how did that come about? 

    CBH: Some of those connections are more interesting than others. Sometimes it ends up being strictly business and only on the Internet, but in cases like Greg Weeks or the Feathers/Witch folks, it leads to fun friendships and meaningful collaborations.

    RINY: What was that experience like?

    CBH: It's so flattering, and humbling to get to meet, and many times become friends with, such beautiful and creative artists. Not to sound too cheesy, but I often feel blessed. I prefer working with other artists too; I love the sense of collaboration and comradery. There's a tremendous amount of artistic freedom and creative input when working with other artists who understand where I am coming from and what I am trying to accomplish.

     

     

    RINY: Do you consider yourself a photographer or an artist?

     CBH: There is a big difference for me between to the two. I never go out intending to document a subject, I want to create fantasy worlds and highlight the magic I see in people and nature.  I want to make images that move people, that people might mistake for a painting, or from being from another time or even another universe; images that transcend the content with in them.  So I consider myself an Artist.

    RINY: Why photography as opposed to other mediums?

    CBH: Photography allows me to play with reality, to create my own worlds. I feel photographs allow for an honesty that can be played with to enable my fantasy worlds to make sense, that people understand that this scene really happened, but they never see the everyday world the way I present it. I never want to make fantasies that are completely unattainable, so photography gives me the ability to insert real people and real world surroundings into my paracosm. My camera lens is a wormhole.
     
    RINY: What type of equipment do you use?

    CBH:  I learned to shoot on a beat up Canon AE-1, and I still shoot Canon to this day, except these days it's digital. I still use all my old AE lens with an adapter; I just can't stand the way the new lenses feel. They are so loose, and I love the having my aperture on my lens. I'm not much for gear; it weighs me down, so I work with what I can. I'm sure if I had bigger budgets there are cameras I'd love to use, but starving artists work with what they have.

     

    RINY: Have any books inspired your work?

    CBH: With out a doubt. I am big fan of fairy tales, and old children's books. Some of my favorites are East of the Sun West of the Moon, an Old Norse tale, The Brown Owl by Ford Maddox Ford, and Donkey Skin a French fairy tale by Charles Perrault. Fairytales, folklore, and mythologies have the same feel to me as my photographs, a realistic unreality. I also live for anything by Joseph Campbell and Carl Sagan.

    RINY: How about films?

    CBH: I love Jean Rollin vampire films, old silent films like Salome, I just recently saw La Belle et la Bête by Jean Cocteau, it blew me away!  There are so many honestly. I'm a big fan of directors like Fellini, Jodorowsky, and David Lynch I feel like I could list so many, at this point I am not entirely sure I could even give you a current theme between them all. Our Netflix queue at home never ends, so I'm a bit overwhelmed by great movies lately.

     

      


     RINY: What other photographers and artists have influenced you or inspire you?

     CBH: This is a hard question for me, I don’t find myself being drawn to one photographer over another.  I love Mucha, Arthur Rahckam, Waterhouse, Frank Frazetta, I also love the photos in old Playboys, but there are so many photographers that took part in that I can’t pick them out really. I should point out though that there are some great current photographers out there that move me, such as Alison Scarpulla, Ellen Rogers, and Caryn Drexel to name a few. It’s really about appreciating certain things whether it be art or nature, and using a camera as a tool to demonstrate that appreciation.

    RINY: Who would you love to photograph and why? 

    CBH: I was just talking about this to a friend not that long ago. I would love to get some of those ladies I listed above as well as an additional handful of other beautiful ladies together (stylists, models, fashion junkies, musicians, and the like). I feel like we have created this web of family via the Internet and friends, it would be great to get us all in one place and just have fun, and document each other. I want to have us embrace each other as artists and feed off of each other’s ideas and create a stronger sense of community. I hope to make it happen not too far from now.

    RINY: With the given resources what sort of scene would you create to photograph?

    CBH: I have always wanted to build a castle with out walls in the forest, beautiful beds and great candelabra stands, long elegant formal tables complete with a fire place by its side all engulfed by pines and maples, I would then fill it with lovely ladies in white with long flowing hair, and Persian cats. I will make it happen.


     

    RINY: What are some images that have inspired you along the way?

     

      

      

      

     

    To find out more about Courtney visit her website: Light Witch

    To see more of her visual influences you can check her blog: Dreamboat Courtney

  • Italians Do It Better: The Radical Design of Superstudio

      

      

      

    Superstudio was an architecture firm, founded in 1966 in Florence, Italy by Adolfo Natalini and Cristiano Toraldo di Francia. It was  part of the Radical architecture movement of the late 1960s.

    In 1967, Natalini established three categories of future research: “architecture of the monument”; the “architecture of the image”; and “tecnomorphic architecture”. Soon, Superstudio would be known for its conceptual architecture works, most notably the 1969 Continuous Monument: An Architectural Model for Total Urbanization.

    Many of their projects were originally published in the magazine Casabella, and ranged from fiction, to storyboard illustration, to photomontage.

    Natalini wrote in 1971 “…if design is merely an inducement to consume, then we must reject design; if architecture is merely the codifying of bourgeois model of ownership and society, then we must reject architecture; if architecture and town planning is merely the formalization of present unjust social divisions, then we must reject town planning and its cities…until all design activities are aimed towards meeting primary needs. Until then, design must disappear. We can live without architecture…”

    Superstudio was influential on architects such as Zaha Hadid, Rem Koolhaas, Bernard Tschumi.

  • John Lennon & The Plastic Ono Band Live in Toronto 1969 Is Some Weird Shit

      

    In 1969 John Lennon & Yoko Ono famously held a two week "bed in" to peacefully protest the Vietnam War. The first one took place in Amsterdam and the second was to be held in New York, but Lennon was banned from the US due to his Cannabis conviction.  They moved the bed in to the Bahamas but the heat bothered them so they moved it to again to Montreal, where it was documented by the CBC. The images below were taken by the CBC and were featured in an exhibition on the event at the Montreal Museum of Fine Art. More info on that here.

     

     

    That same year John Lennon and The Plastic Ono Band played the Toronto Peace Festival. The band, which also featured Eric Clapton, Klaus Voorman (who designed The Beatles Revolver album Cover) and Yes drummer Alan White, were billed with Little Richard, Bo Diddley and Jerry Lee Lewis.

     

     

    A live version of the performance was recorded and released on record in 1969, while the film footage, directed by D.A. Pennebaker, was released as Sweet Toronto in 1971. Both have been reissued within the last couple years.

     

     

    Many people are familiar with the band's song, "Give Peace A Chance", but I don't think most people just how weird, and good this band was. Beatles fans obviously hate it, which explains why the were almost booed off the stage. Below is a clip.

     

     

    For those who do like it. I would highly suggest you pick up John Lennon / Plastic Ono Band, which was co-produced by Phil Spector and Yoko's companion record, Yoko Ono / Plastic Ono Band. Both covers are shown below and if you look closely you'll see that they're not identical.

     

      

    Categories: Music, Hippies
  • Mark Maggiori | Artist & Photographer

    Mark Maggiori is a filmmaker, painter & photographer. He's french. He's awesome.

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

     

      

      

      

  • Michael English & Nigel Waymouth Were Hapshash & The Coloured Coat

      

    Hapshash & The Coloured Coat were a sixties design duo that consisted of Nigel Waymouth and Michale English. Along with fellow artist Martin Sharp, the collective were heavily associated with London's psychedelic scene.

    From John Coulthart:

    "This was a bitter blow coming at a time when I’ve been working on something inspired in part by Hapshash and the Coloured Coat, the 1960s design duo comprised of Michael English and Nigel Waymouth. The two artists, together with associate Martin Sharp, are indelibly associated with the London psychedelic scene of the late Sixties. Whereas Sharp’s posters were often loose and dramatically bold explosions of shape and colour, the Hapshash posters were more carefully controlled in their curating of disparate elements borrowed from Art Nouveau—especially Mucha and Beardsely—comic strips, Op Art, Pop art and fantasy illustration. Their work perfectly complemented the very distinctive atmosphere of the capital’s psychedelic scene which, for a couple of hectic years, saw an explosion of new bands (or old bands in new guises) fervently engaged in a lysergic exploration of Victoriana, childhood memories and frequent silliness. UK psychedelia is generally more frivolous than its US equivalent which had the Vietnam War and civil disorder to deal with; English and Waymouth’s graphics captured the London mood."

    Additional images sourced from The Who Collection
  • Selected Covers of OZ Magazine

    OZ began in 1963 as a humor magazine in Sydney, Australia, but from 1967 to 1973 the publiction survived as a psychedelic hippie magazine in London. In 1970, Oz went on an obscenities trail for publishing a sexual explicit adaptation of an x-rated R. Crumb cartoon.  Yoko Ono and John Lennon jumped to the magazine's defense and organzied the recording of "God Save Oz" by the Elastic Oz Band, which was released on The Beatles' Apple label. Lennon originally demoed the song but due to contractual obligations had turn over the recording to Bill Elliot. Lennon's version would later be released on his anthology.  Other support for Oz came from John Peel, Marty Feldman and Caroline Coon.

    Wiki

         

         

         

         

         

         

         

         

         

    Images sourced from Wussu

    You may also like Barney BubblesMr. Fish | Andrzej Kilmowski | Roger Dean | RAT Subterranean News | Hipgnosis | Stan Vanderbeek | Tadanori Yokoo | Quentin Crisp | Milton Galser | Tonite Let's All Make Love in London |

  • Soft Machine Documentary & Other Bits

     

     Canterbury's grooviest on grainy celluloid and all.

     

     

      

      

      

     

    ...And Those Other Bits

     

     NJ's grooviest

     

     Cambodia's grooviest

     

     

     

  • The Legacy of Prickly Mountain | Vermont's Hippie Heaven

    In 1965 David Sellers and Bill Rienecke, freshly graduated from the Yale School of Architecture, came to Vermont looking to build something. They were attracted to Vermont as much by the skiing and partying as the opportunity to build without the restrictions of zoning regulations or planning commissions. They discovered 450 acres, mostly abandoned farmland and unimproved forest that they were able to buy for $1,000 down apiece. The name came when another architect friend, John Lucas, sat down on a raspberry bush and—ouch!—Prickly Mountain was born.

    Above from the great Rolu

    The Legacy of Prickly Mountain

    Built as an antiestablishment utopia in the mid 1960s, Vermont enclave Prickly Mountain has had a profound influence on contemporary architecture

    I’ve always loved the kind of novels that offer an alternative view of the present, where the plot is predicated on one key event in history playing out differently. For instance, there’s Kingsley Amis’s The Alteration, set in England nearly five centuries after the Protestant Reformation didn’t take place. The Catholic Church is unchallenged in its authority, and castrati still sing in the choir. Similarly when Czech Cubism, the surreal cousin to Modernism, emerged after the disintegration of the Iron Curtain, I tried to imagine what the world would be like today if, instead of the rectilinear approach associated with the Bauhaus, an architecture based on triangles and crystalline forms became the norm. Imagine Park Avenue lined with buildings that look like…well, like Norman Foster’s new Hearst headquarters.

    This is the appeal of Prickly Mountain. A 425-acre enclave not far from the Sugarbush ski resort, it’s a repository of an architectural revolution that never quite took off, a storybook version of the world as it might have been. Or as Progressive Architecture put it in May 1966: “Are you ready? Two lumbering mountaineers just out of Yale Architecture have a project going called Prickly Mountain…and they’re putting down the Establishment by acting as entrepreneur, land speculator, and contractor and craftsman as well as architects, and doing the whole blooming thing themselves. It’s architectural blastoff.”

    More here

  • The Mellow World of Sun in Scorpio

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

    If Pamela Courson had a blog. It might have looked like this. Visit Sun in Scorpio.

  • The Whole Earth Catalog

      

      

    I was first turned on to the Whole Earth Catalog by my friend and old boss, John Wackman. He described the catalog as the sort of "Sears Catalog of cool and interesting things" as well as "the first blog." He couldn't have been more right.  According to Wikipedia, "The Whole Earth Catalog was an American counterculture catalog published by Stewart Brand between 1968 and 1972, and occasionally thereafter, until 1998. Although the WECs listed all sorts of products for sale (clothing, books, tools, machines, seeds -- anything for a self-sustainable ""hippie" lifestyle) the Whole Earth Catalogs themselves did not sell any of the products. Instead the vendors and their prices were listed right alongside with the items. This led to a need for the Catalogs to be frequently updated. Apple Inc. founder and entrepreneur Steve Jobs has described the Catalog as the conceptual forerunner of the World Wide Web."

    The catalog featured brief, blog-like entries on weird stuff that you would now find in selective, curated stores and websites around the city. These entries were written by the likes of: The Black Panthers, Walter / Wendy Carlos, William S. Burroughs, Peter Coyote, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Buckminster Fuller, Ram Daas, Wavy Gravy, Ken Kessey, Paul Krassener, Dalai Lama, Timothy Leary, Alice Waters, The Yippies, and so many more.

    Some of the more notable article titles included:

    The Global Mushroom Trade
    The Double Bubble Wheel Engine
    Left Handed Bears and Androgynous Cassowaries
    Poets on the Bum
    The Ultimate Swiss Omni Knife
    Son of Man Temple
    What are People For?
    Computational Chemistry
    A Witch's Manifesto
    Do It Yourself Eclipse Prediction
    Obeying Chogyam Trungpa
    Outside the Yuppie Zoo
    The Living Water Garden
    God is a Verb
    Tiptoeing Out of Real Estate
    Dr. Seuss: Architect of Social Change
    Death Does Not Exist
    Am I Psychic Yet?
    The Beauty of Disconnection
    Organizing Programs as Mind Extension Tools
    Shit
    Juggling and Performing Mathematics
    Big Foot No Longer Fair Game
    A Hard Look at Soft Woods
    King Kong Died For Our Sins
    Model Rockets

    From the opening page of the 1969 Catalog:

    Function

    The WHOLE EARTH CATALOG functions as an evaluation and access device. With it, the user should know better what is worth getting and where and how to do the getting. An item is listed in the CATALOG if it is deemed:

           1. Useful as a tool,
           2. Relevant to independent education,
           3. High quality or low cost,
           4. Not already common knowledge,
           5. Easily available by mail.

        CATALOG listings are continually revised according to the experience and suggestions of CATALOG users and staff.   

    Purpose

    We are as gods and might as well get good at it. So far, remotely done power and glory—as via government, big business, formal education, church—has succeeded to the point where gross defects obscure actual gains. In response to this dilemma and to these gains a realm of intimate, personal power is developing—power of the individual to conduct his own education, find his own inspiration, shape his own environment, and share his adventure with whoever is interested. Tools that aid this process are sought and promoted by the WHOLE EARTH CATALOG.

    Official
    Wikipedia

    Categories: Reading List, Hippies, Books
  • Vintage Citreon Ads | The Original French Hippie Car

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

    Way more at Citrobe
    Categories: Cars, Design, Hippies
  • Woodstock Handmade Houses

    I'll be in Woodstock next weekend for the New Year. In honor of that, here's a pretty cool book devoted to the handmade houses of Woodstock.

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

    About five years ago, I had the pleasure of staying in the house on the left. The photo to the right is my friend Mike who made that happen. There's at least 30 years difference between to the two pictures and the house looks just about the same.