House

  • Songs of the Day

    Barry Brown & Little John - Sensemilia

     

     

    The Cultural Decay - Brave New World

     

     

    Girls At Our Best - Fast Boyfriends

     

     

    999 - Homocide

     

    Eden Kane - Boys Cry

     

     

    Phuture - Rise From Your Grave

  • Songs of the Day

      

    The Necessaries | Detroit Tonight | An Arthur Russel band featuring Ernie Brooks from The Modern Lovers. Bluesy Rock, not quite as good as solo Arthur or any of his other various side projects. This song is probably the most pop friendly on the album

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • The Legacy of Prickly Mountain | Vermont's Hippie Heaven

    In 1965 David Sellers and Bill Rienecke, freshly graduated from the Yale School of Architecture, came to Vermont looking to build something. They were attracted to Vermont as much by the skiing and partying as the opportunity to build without the restrictions of zoning regulations or planning commissions. They discovered 450 acres, mostly abandoned farmland and unimproved forest that they were able to buy for $1,000 down apiece. The name came when another architect friend, John Lucas, sat down on a raspberry bush and—ouch!—Prickly Mountain was born.

    Above from the great Rolu

    The Legacy of Prickly Mountain

    Built as an antiestablishment utopia in the mid 1960s, Vermont enclave Prickly Mountain has had a profound influence on contemporary architecture

    I’ve always loved the kind of novels that offer an alternative view of the present, where the plot is predicated on one key event in history playing out differently. For instance, there’s Kingsley Amis’s The Alteration, set in England nearly five centuries after the Protestant Reformation didn’t take place. The Catholic Church is unchallenged in its authority, and castrati still sing in the choir. Similarly when Czech Cubism, the surreal cousin to Modernism, emerged after the disintegration of the Iron Curtain, I tried to imagine what the world would be like today if, instead of the rectilinear approach associated with the Bauhaus, an architecture based on triangles and crystalline forms became the norm. Imagine Park Avenue lined with buildings that look like…well, like Norman Foster’s new Hearst headquarters.

    This is the appeal of Prickly Mountain. A 425-acre enclave not far from the Sugarbush ski resort, it’s a repository of an architectural revolution that never quite took off, a storybook version of the world as it might have been. Or as Progressive Architecture put it in May 1966: “Are you ready? Two lumbering mountaineers just out of Yale Architecture have a project going called Prickly Mountain…and they’re putting down the Establishment by acting as entrepreneur, land speculator, and contractor and craftsman as well as architects, and doing the whole blooming thing themselves. It’s architectural blastoff.”

    More here