Magazines

  • Avant Garde Magazine

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

    Avant Garde was a magazine notable for graphic and logogram design by Herb Lubalin. The magazine had 16 issues and was published from January 1968 to July 1971.

    From January, 1968, through July, 1971, Ginzburg published Avant Garde, which like Eros, an earlier publishing attempt, was a handsome hardbound periodical. While it could not be termed obscene, but it was filled with creative imagery often caustically critical of American society and government, sexual themes, and (for the time) crude language. One cover featured a naked pregnant woman; another had a parody of Willard's famous patriotic painting, "The Spirit of '76", with a woman and a black man.

    Avant Garde had a modest circulation but was extremely popular in certain circles, including New York’s advertising and editorial art directors. Herbert F. Lubalin (1918–1981), a post-modern design guru, was Ginzburg's collaborator on his four best-known magazines, including Avant Garde which gave birth to a well-known typeface of the same name. It was originally intended primarily for use in logos: the first version consisted solely of 26 capital letters. It was inspired by Ginzburg and his wife, designed by Lubalin, and realized by Lubalin's assistants and Tom Carnese, one of Lubalin's partners. It is characterized by geometrically perfect round strokes; short, straight lines; and an extremely large number of ligatures and negative kerning. The International Typefont Corporation(ITC) (of which Lubalin was a founder) released a full version in 1970.

    An article on folk music written by United States Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas was a topic in the congressional hearings on his attempted impeachment in 1970.

  • Bixobal Magazine | Publish More Issues Please

      

      

    Bixobal is magazine published by Ri Be Xibalba. They've published 5 issues. They need to publish more. Notable Stories have included:

    The No-Neck Blues Band's Dave Nuss recalls his time with The Source Family which led to the first Yahowa 13 performance in New York City and their new LP. As much about Dave's experiences throughout this and how it brought him into the Family, as about discovering the wealth of their archives and continuing energy.

    Akio Suzuki's diary from the 2006 Resonant Spaces tour in the UK during June 2006 as translated and introduced by Alan Cummings.

    The Infinite Horizons of Stomu Yamash'ta by Gregor Meyer - a massive overview of the life and work of avant garde percussionist Stomu Yamash'ta, including his first English-language interview in over 30 years. A child prodigy, his meteoric rise in the Classical world spawned a new world of improvisation and Avant Classical in the late '60s and early '70s before melding Eastern concepts with Jazz Fusion via his more well known outfits Come to the Edge, East Wind, and Go. Includes never-before-revealed insight into collaborations with Toru Takemitsu, Takehisa Kosugi, Masahiko Sato, the Baschet brothers, and others. Years in the making, this exhaustive survey corrects misinformation and apocrypha carried down for decades, and opens a new window to Yamash'ta's current projects featuring instruments made from resonant stones. Includes an complete discography of his official releases.

    an incredibly fun discussion with Peter Stampfel, founding member of the Holy Modal Rounders, about Harry Smith, the Fugs, Santeria, amphetamines, god, coincidence, music and much more. conducted by Allan MacInnis, this 19 page feature includes an illustration by Peter's daughter Zoe, plus a supplemental 3 page interview with Antonia Stampfel

    an interview with Gerd Kraus on the legendary Krautrock bands Limbus 3 and Limbus 4 and the heady times that they grew out of

    Jesse Paul Miller on his habit of collecting "bad" records

    book dealer and artist Dave Hornor gives us the run down on books by Tuli Kupferburg of The Fugs

  • Church of London | Huck Magazine, Little White Lies, Geoff McFectridge & Where The Wild Things Are

     

    The next issues of Little White Lies and Huck will look remarkably good on your newsagent's shelves: the magazines' covers are two parts of a single illustration by Geoff McFetridge...

    The Church Of London, the creative agency founded by Rob Longworth, Danny Miller and Paul Willoughby, publishes, art directs and designs both film magazine Little White Lies and surf, skate and snowboarding style title, Huck.

    The forthcoming issues feature Spike Jonze's Where The Wild Things Are in some way: the director is interviewed in Huck (hence he appears on the cover alonside some rather intrusive "wild things"), while Little White Lies is wholly dedicated to the new film, based on Maurice Sendak's children's book (main character, Max, features on their cover).

     

    Via Creative Review

     

    The Church of London's Movie Poster Designs
     

         

      

      

     

    Little White Lies Magazine

     

         

         

      

    Huck Magazine
     

         

  • Feed Your Head The Good Stuff

    Feed Your Head complied a collection of scanned underground papers dealing with psychedelics and the mainstream papers that covered them.  The images below are some of the examples featured on the site. These, along with Feed Your Head's "nutshell" explanations of the papers, feature the usual suspects - Ginsberg, Leary, McKenna, Heard, Watts, Kesey and handful of the lesser known characters.

     

      

      

      

      

     

      

      

      

      

  • Frederic Magazine | Art

    Frederic Fleury is a French artist that co-runs editions 57 and is one of the founding members of Frederic Magazine. You can see an unbelievable amount of images by visiting the magazine here.  You can visit his flickr page here. And you can buy some of his stuff from Nieves, whose site is also worth exploring.

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

    X-Rated doodles after the jump

    Categories: Magazines, Artists, art
  • From the pages of DOT Dot DOT

    Dot Dot Dot is a magazine published out of the Lower East Side of Manhattan. They have thus far published 17 issues. Their latest issue features Genesis P-Orridge on the cover. In their words:

    "Since its conception in 2000 DDD has immatured into a jocuserious fanzine-journal-orphanage based on true stories deeply concerned with art-design-music-language-literature-architecture and uptight optipessimistic stoppy/revelatory ghostwriting by friendly spirits mapping b-sides and out-takes pushing for a resolution in bleak midwinter through late summer with local and general aesthetics wound on an ever tightening coil."

     

      

      

      

      

      

    More information here

    Categories: Magazines, art
  • Hari Kari Covers

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

    Hari-Kari, which also ran by the subtitle: Journal Bete et Mechant (Stupid & Vicious Magazine), was a French magazine that was once banned in France for their controversial aim at the government and the church. More here. To see almost the enitre collection go here.

    Categories: Magazines, Sex
  • Henry Wolf | Graphic Designer

        

        

        

        

        

        

     

    Henry was a photographer, art director and graphic designer best known for his art direction of Esquire, Harpers Bazaar, and Show during the 50's and 60's.

  • Isolated Magick Zine by French

    16 page full color zine. Get it while it's hot. Also avilable is the signed, edition of 30, Wickerman screen print. It'll set you back about 30 bucks and it's shown below.

    Peruse French here.

  • Momus & Shinro Ohtake

    I've been a fan of the Momus blog, Imomus pretty much since he started blogging. It's always entertaining, especially when he's in Japan, where he happens to be at the moment.  In this particular post he talks about the artist & photographer, Shinro Ohtake, who spent a lot of time documenting the British punk scene circa 1977 for his book UK 77. I need this book.  Below are some quips from Momus, some photos from the book and some additional artwork.

      

      

    "In a series of massive picture books filled with photographs, drawings and scrap memorabilia (but particularly UK 77) Ohtake has documented seventies London better, to my mind, than any British artist or photographer.

    It's not that Ohtake -- aged 22 in 1977, he'd just graduated from Musashino Art University -- avoids the punk rock cliches that now pass for cultural history of the late 70s in the UK. His photos show us that Bozz Scaggs. Elkie Brooks, Elton John and The Enid featured on UK posters in 1977 rather more than The Damned and The Sex Pistols did, but he has plenty of shots of punk rockers, and clippings from the snarky music press and listings magazines. It's rather that Ohtake shows the entire context; views out of the window, tickets from gigs, confectionery wrappers, books of matches with adverts on them.

    What comes as a shock is how much of the UK in 1977 was stuck in the 1960s; there are silly little Hillman Imp cars, and ridiculous child-molester hairstyles in the barber windows, trickledown domestications from the wilder shores of 1960s subculture. It's all pretty grim and muddy, but it does show you where punk's disgust came from. And it's telling that it takes a Japanese photographer -- a sort of impartial Martian in this weird and depressing landscape -- to document the UK properly. Sitting in gm ten gallery flipping through Ohtake's back pages, I was completely transported back to the era, with exactly the right combination of repulsion and nostalgia, shudder and swoon."

    Continue @ Imomus

    Additional work

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

  • Rare 70's Erotic Magazine Covers

    Editions du Japyx

      

      

      

      

    Edtions Les Naiades

      

      

      

      

      

    via Au Carrefour Etrange

  • Rat Subterranean News | Underground Newspaper

      

      

      

    The Rat was an underground, New York anarchist newspaper started by Jeff Nightbyrd, Alice Embree and Gary Thiher in 1968. They covered things like the Weather Underground, The Black Panthers, The Young Lords, street drugs, bombings, music and sex.  They're rumored to have to started the "Paul is Dead" rumor, which had millions of people playing Beatles records backwards looking for cyrptic messages and received content contributions from people like R. Crumb and William S. Burroughs.

    Images sourced from the Dodd Center

    Categories: Magazines, Politics, Anarchy
  • Roman Cieslewicz

      

    Above & Below images from the collection of Agnes B

      

    above collaboration with Helmut Newton

      

      

    Roman CieĹ›lewicz was a Polish graphic artist and photographer.  He was artistic editor of "Ty i Ja" monthly (Warsaw) 1959-1962 . In 1963 he moved to France and  worked as art director of Vogue, Elle (1965-1969) and Mafia - advertising agency (1969-1972) and was artistic creator of Opus International (1967-1969). Kitsch (1970-1971) and Cnac-archives (1971-11974). Taught at the Ecole Superieure d'Arts Graphiques (ESAG) in Paris. In 1976 he produced his "reviev of panic information" - "Kamikaze"/No. 1/ published by Christian Bourgois. In 1991 he produced "Kamikaze 2" with Agnes B.

  • Selected Covers of OZ Magazine

    OZ began in 1963 as a humor magazine in Sydney, Australia, but from 1967 to 1973 the publiction survived as a psychedelic hippie magazine in London. In 1970, Oz went on an obscenities trail for publishing a sexual explicit adaptation of an x-rated R. Crumb cartoon.  Yoko Ono and John Lennon jumped to the magazine's defense and organzied the recording of "God Save Oz" by the Elastic Oz Band, which was released on The Beatles' Apple label. Lennon originally demoed the song but due to contractual obligations had turn over the recording to Bill Elliot. Lennon's version would later be released on his anthology.  Other support for Oz came from John Peel, Marty Feldman and Caroline Coon.

    Wiki

         

         

         

         

         

         

         

         

         

    Images sourced from Wussu

    You may also like Barney BubblesMr. Fish | Andrzej Kilmowski | Roger Dean | RAT Subterranean News | Hipgnosis | Stan Vanderbeek | Tadanori Yokoo | Quentin Crisp | Milton Galser | Tonite Let's All Make Love in London |

  • The International Times | What was the world's best underground paper

    I've been collecting underground newspapers forever and the Interantional Times is by far one of the best.  Soft Machine, PInk Floyd, Arthur Brown and more supported it. Paul McCartney donated money it. Burroughs, Ginsberg, Trocchi, John Peel and others wrote for it. Now, just about the entire archives are available on-line.  Holy shit. Go there now .

         

      

         

         

      

      

         

      

         

         

         

         

         

         

         

    International Times (it or IT) was an underground paper founded in London in 1966.  The paper's logo was a black-and-white image of Theda Bara, vampish star of silent films. The founders' original intention had been to incorporate an image of the actress Clara Bow because she'd been known as The IT girl, but an image of Theda Bara was used by accident and, once deployed, was never changed. Paul McCartney donated to the paper.

    International Times was launched on 14 October 1966 at The Roundhouse at a gig featuring Pink Floyd. The event promised a 'Pop/Op/Costume/Masque/Fantasy-Loon/Blowout/Drag Ball and featured Soft Machine, steel bands, strips, trips, happenings, movies. The launch was described as "one of the two most revolutionary events in the history of English alternative music and thinking. The IT event was important because it marked the first recognition of a rapidly spreading socio-cultural revolution that had its parallel in the States" by David Allen of Soft Machine.

    From April 1967, and for some while later, the police raided the offices of International Times to try, it was alleged, to force the paper out of business. A benefit event labelled The 14 Hour Technicolor Dream took place at Alexandra Palace on 29 April 1967. Bands included Pink Floyd, The Pretty Things, Savoy Brown, The Crazy World of Arthur Brown, Soft Machine, The Move, and Sam Gopal Dream.

    IT first ceased publication in 1972, after being convicted for running contact ads for gay men, and for a longer period in 1974, but merged with Maya, another underground publication, and was revived in 1975, continuing until 1982. It resurfaced in 1986... into the 1990s. There have been a total of 209 issues. It was a contemporary of other radical underground London magazines, Oz, Friends and Ink.

    Many people who became prominent UK figures wrote for IT, including feminist critic Germaine Greer, poet and social commentator Jeff Nuttall, and DJ John Peel. There were many original contributions from underground writers such as Alexander Trocchi; William Burroughs and Allen Ginsberg.

    In 1986 IT was relaunched by Tony Allen and Chris Brook. After two issues (Volume 86; issues 1,2) Allen left, and Brook continued with a reinvigorated editorial group for two more issues (Volume 86; issues 3,4). After various one-off issues into 1991, 2000 saw Brook and others create a web-based presence - initially through the alternative server 'Phreak', circa 1996.

    Wikipedia

    Categories: Magazines, Music, Politics, Zines, Sex
  • Wet Magazine Covers

      

      

      

     

    Wet was an avant-garde Los Angeles-based magazine that revolved around the idea of "gourmet bathing" and later evolved to "gourmet bathing and beyond." Its publisher and creator was Leonard Koren, an architecture school graduate. The magazine covered cultural issues and was known for its innovative use of graphic art.

    Over the years, Wet began to reflect a broader expanse of stories, capturing a kind of smart, artsy Los Angeles attitude that was emerging at the same time as punk, but had its own distinct aesthetic. Wet lasted 34 issues, spanning the years 1976 to 1981.

     

      

      

      

      

    You can read the entire July / August 1981 Issue here and the entire December 81 Issue here. Covers were sourced here.