Posters

  • Boston Tea Party Posters

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

     

    Sixties Posters has assembled the largest collection of Boston Tea Party posters I've seen anywhere and the best part is that you can bid on them. You'll need deep pockets though.

    The Boston Tea Party was a concert venue located on 53 Berkeley Street in Boston, Massachusetts.

    Originally the site of a synagogue, and then a street mission, the location was later converted into a venue that showed underground films, before being bought by Ray Riepen and David Hahn and converted again into a concert venue. It opened as a rock music hall on January 20, 1967.

    The venue became associated with the psychedelic movement, being similar in this way to other contemporary rock halls such as New York's Fillmore East and Electric Circus, San Francisco's Fillmore West, and Philadelphia's Electric Factory.

    The early history of this venue is documented in the book Mansion on the Hill by Fred Goodman.

    Wikipedia

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  • Flyers From Parties Thrown at Home Sweet Home

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

      

        

      

      

      

      

  • Michael English & Nigel Waymouth Were Hapshash & The Coloured Coat

      

    Hapshash & The Coloured Coat were a sixties design duo that consisted of Nigel Waymouth and Michale English. Along with fellow artist Martin Sharp, the collective were heavily associated with London's psychedelic scene.

    From John Coulthart:

    "This was a bitter blow coming at a time when I’ve been working on something inspired in part by Hapshash and the Coloured Coat, the 1960s design duo comprised of Michael English and Nigel Waymouth. The two artists, together with associate Martin Sharp, are indelibly associated with the London psychedelic scene of the late Sixties. Whereas Sharp’s posters were often loose and dramatically bold explosions of shape and colour, the Hapshash posters were more carefully controlled in their curating of disparate elements borrowed from Art Nouveau—especially Mucha and Beardsely—comic strips, Op Art, Pop art and fantasy illustration. Their work perfectly complemented the very distinctive atmosphere of the capital’s psychedelic scene which, for a couple of hectic years, saw an explosion of new bands (or old bands in new guises) fervently engaged in a lysergic exploration of Victoriana, childhood memories and frequent silliness. UK psychedelia is generally more frivolous than its US equivalent which had the Vietnam War and civil disorder to deal with; English and Waymouth’s graphics captured the London mood."

    Additional images sourced from The Who Collection